Review of The Arrivals by Melissa Marr

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★☆ 


Science Fiction Western is probably the most accurate classification for The Arrivals by Melissa Marr


Jake and Kitty have been in the Wasteland for twenty six years now. They originally came from the Wild West in the 1800′s and have no idea how they came to this alien environment. They have new arrivals that join their crew from different moments in history but none from before their time. They occasionally die as well but never permanently though their companions aren’t so lucky. Their greatest enemy is a man called Ajani who is raping the land of all its mineral wealth and leaving it barren with no hope of survival to the indigenous inhabitants. Life in the Wasteland is full of danger with dragon worms, insect vampires and demon monks but for Jake and Kitty it feels like home.

I really enjoyed this interesting combination of a western science fiction novel. Kitty is by far the most interesting character though the rest of the motley crew make for an interesting read. What stopped me from given this a higher rating is that it felt like a short story that was stretched out. Yes it was fun and thrilling but I felt the characters could have been developed a little more and we never find out why Kitty can do spells and no one else from earth can. None the less I remain a fan of the amazing Melissa Marr.

If you’re skeptical of blending Westerns with Science Fiction, this formula has been used successfully with Joss Whedon’s ‘Firefly’ television series, and with classic Science Fiction author, Andre Norton.

Have you read The Arrivals? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of The Arrivals.

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About the Reviewer: Yvonne lives on the NSW/Victorian border in Australia so it is always boiling hot or freezing cold, in other words great reading weather. She reads across all genres with the exception of Westerns. During the day Yvonne works at a library and loves her job and can’t imagine doing anything else.

You can connect with Yvonne on Twitter or Goodreads.

Review of The Ups and Downs of Being Dead by M. R. Cornelius

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★☆ 


In The Ups and Downs of Being Dead by M. R. Cornelius, Robert is the protagonist, and his life wasn’t going as expected. His marriage wasn’t a happy one, and while his daughter made him proud, his son was a drug addict with no prospects. Robert then gets diagnosed with cancer and his options suddenly become very limited. But Robert is never one to gracefully accept defeat, and a chance meeting with Alex Darden changes his options. Instead of dying, Robert chooses to get cryonically preserved. While the technology is there to freeze people no one knows when or if it will be there to thaw them out again.


Robert expects to lie down to sleep and wake up suddenly in a brave new world so he is very surprised to be met by two people who are frozen themselves. Robert can do or go anywhere in the world he wants, but he can’t touch anything and no one can see him. He can’t eat or drink or sleep again. Against warnings Robert makes a decision that will change his un-dead life, he tries to go home…

I really enjoyed this story of a man who was a workaholic and to be quite honest, not a nice man and the transformation that occurs over the years of him being dead. The story makes you think about the choices you make in life and how it affects the people around you. It was well written and the story had me gripped until the very end.

Have you read The Ups and Downs of Being Dead? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of The Ups and Downs of Being Dead.

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About the Reviewer: Yvonne lives on the NSW/Victorian border in Australia so it is always boiling hot or freezing cold, in other words great reading weather. She reads across all genres with the exception of Westerns. During the day Yvonne works at a library and loves her job and can’t imagine doing anything else.

You can connect with Yvonne on Twitter or Goodreads.

Book Review of Pacific Rim. Novelization by Alex Irvine

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★☆ 


-We couldn’t keep nuking them (the kaiju), or pretty soon the Earth was going to be destroyed while we were trying to save it.

I didn’t want to like Pacific Rim-I suppose I thought I was too sophisticated for what’s essentially Die Hard meets Godzilla with a little bit of Rocky thrown in for good measure. I have to admit, however, that Pacific Rim is an entertaining read. Let’s face it, we all need a little junk-food for the soul from time to time, and this book serves it up in a very digestible format.


Is this an original story, or is it a rip off of Godzilla? As a kid, I watched UltraMan on TV. Yes, it was the exact same storyline in every episode, but I didn’t mind. Of course the UltraMan special effects were an absolute joke with plastic monsters stepping on cardboard buildings, but old-school Godzilla special effects were no better. Pacific Rim takes these established international cultural icons and pulls them into the twenty-first century.

I’m torn on the question of originality, because on one hand the story is essentially a chapter right out of Godzilla/UltraMan lure, yet on the other hand it’s been so long since there’s been a mainstream quality adaptation that it really was refreshing. Viewed through the lens of current time where we’ve been doused with sequels upon sequels like Ironman, the Avengers and X-Men, I really do feel like this is an original (almost “new”) creative concept.

Is the story-line cliché? Yes, there are absolutely some stereotypical science fiction/action elements, but I found that the original creative elements substantially outweighed the tired and clichéd. Certainly putting humans inside giant robots was a new twist, although a little hard to embrace with modern technology going the other way with the deployment of drones (no pilots) in modern combat.

There were a few other legitimate surprises that popped up throughout the story. These really helped to keep the plot line a little off balance and less predictable which I thought was a nice touch.

Why did the Kaiju come? Pacific Rim has an environmental backdrop to the story with quotes like “We terraformed Earth for the kaiju.” Basically kaiju are the second coming of the prehistoric dinosaurs, and the damage that we as humans have done to the Earth has just started the downward spiral of the planet which the kaiju will finish.

There are a lot of valid reasons to take better care of our environment, but I don’t think sewing the seeds for kaiju destruction is among them. This is the first of several weak science backdrops that really didn’t work for me.

Where’s the Science in this Science Fiction? I am not a hard science geek who reads Science Fiction books with the intent of identifying any scientific impossibilities, but the major premises in Pacific Rim are really more like fantasy than Science Fiction.

I really don’t think we have to worry about dinosaurs rising out of the Marianas Trench (the “breach”) trying to take over the Earth. Even more far-fetched to me was the synching of minds (the “drift”) needed to operate a Jaeger. This concept worked brilliantly to create some tension within the story line, but it’s just not believable to me on any scale, and I’m really not that fussy. I’m fine with technology that makes people invisible, travelling faster than the speed of light, teleporting, time-travel and many other questionable technologies that Science Fiction stories employ, but this was just too far off the “never gonna happen” spectrum for me.

Humor in a story like ‘Pacific Rim’? The utter geekiness and tension between the two scientists, Newt & Gottlieb, added a humorous element to the story. I wouldn’t necessarily expect any humor in a science fiction/action film like this, but I quite enjoyed it. I haven’t seen the film yet, but I’m curious to see if any of this humor gets translated into the big screen.

How does the story mesh with current society? As impossible as it was for me to embrace some of the fictional elements of the story, I really appreciated other elements that meshed nicely with the real world.

For instance, I thought it was really clever to have crime bosses who were responsible for selling kaiju body parts on the black market for a huge profit. Additionally, I liked the concept of the “kaiju slum” where people opted to live in the radioactive forbidden zones despite the contamination from the dead kaiju. This seemed plausible as well based on trade-offs made by people who are poor or looking to go off-the-grid.

-Today we are cancelling the apocalypse. -Striker Pentecost

Pacific Rim is no Shakespeare, but it doesn’t pretend to be. If you enjoy action stories, military Science Fiction or monster stories then you will almost certainly like the fast-paced action in Pacific Rim. Even though it’s not an especially deep storyline, it does cover a lot of ground. Once you get through about the first third of the book which layouts out the plot and provides character background, the final two-thirds are hard-to-put-down exciting.

By the way, if you’re looking for a film review of Pacific Rim, I came across this one which I thought was quite good.

Have you read Pacific Rim or seen the film? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of Pacific Rim.

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Review of Scout’s Honour by Peter Laurent

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★½☆ 


In Scout’s Honour by Peter Laurent, Jayson is the pilot of the Machaera, one of the ships belonging to the Academy. He is sent out on what should have been a routine mission, to get supplies along with Matt and Zoe. But right from the start it is obvious that something more is happening here. The location off the coast of Hong Kong puts them in enemy territory. The team prepare for the worst, they armor up and pack some serious heat but nothing they do will make them ready for what they will face when they arrive.


This novella bridges the gap between book one and two of The Covert Academy series. It is fast paced and full of action. It was a quick, intense and enjoyable read. My only problem with it was that the dialogue had a tendency to get a bit clunky and wooden. This aside it is a must read for anyone who enjoyed the first book as I did.

We also reviewed Peter Laurent’s first book, The Covert Academy; click here to take a peek.

Have you read Scout’s Honour? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of Scout’s Honour.

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About the Reviewer: Yvonne lives on the NSW/Victorian border in Australia so it is always boiling hot or freezing cold, in other words great reading weather. She reads across all genres with the exception of Westerns. During the day Yvonne works at a library and loves her job and can’t imagine doing anything else.

You can connect with Yvonne on Twitter or Goodreads.

Review of Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★★ 


There is no doubt that David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas is a clever book. It is a work that makes demands on its readers but rewards the persistent student with a novel of breathtaking scope, one peopled with well-drawn characters and written with an exquisite, flowing prose.


The greatest challenge is its construction: six chronological novellas, spanning the nineteenth century to the far future, each of which are interrupted half way through by the next story in line. The sixth and final story is completed as a single piece and at its end the author picks up the fifth story and finishes it, and then concludes the fourth, the third, the second and finally he ends the novel by closing the story with which it began. Some, including the author, have called this a “Russian doll” structure, but to the reader it is more akin to scaling a mountain, climbing through each climatic zone to reach the peak, then descending each level until eventually returning to base.

As the reader begins the latest story both the plot and the characters of each previous story must be retained ready for its conclusion. The task is made more difficult as Mitchell adopts a different style and genre for each novella and writes using sentence construction and vocabulary suitable to the time period in which it takes place (including a derivative English in the sixth story, a post-apocalyptical tale set in the far future). This has the effect of encouraging the reader to focus on the story in hand but threatens to overwhelm the details of the one just read. This danger is alleviated by each story being linked. As the novel moves through time a character in one story is able to read a document or view a film describing the previous story; sometimes a younger character in one will appear as an older character in the next. There is a more tenuous connection involving a comet shaped birthmark and there are many broader themes running throughout concerning, prejudice, slavery, freedom and power – to name a few.

Is the novel science fiction? Story five, (An Orison of Somni-451) about a cloned fabricant ascending to independent self-awareness, and story six, the post-apocalyptic central core  (Stoosha’s Crossin’ an’ Ev’rythin’ After) most definitely are. The third novella (Half Lives: The First Luisa Rey Mystery) is a modern thriller and would only be considered science fiction by those who thought The China Syndrome to be in the genre, while the fourth (The Ghastly Ordeal of Timothy Cavendish) about a publisher who accidentally books into a nursing home then cannot escape, is more a horror story. The first (The Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing) a diary of an American’s adventures in the Chatham Islands and the second (Letters from Zedelghem) a story concerning an amanuensis to a famous but dying composer told through his letters to an old friend,  are mainstream. However, the overall effect of this mixed genre journey from the past to the far future is one that sits comfortably within the SF label.

Is the novel the masterpiece that some have claimed? Almost. The cleverness of its construction and its beautifully written prose brings it very close, but it lacks revelation, a moment that changes one’s thinking. To the avid SF reader the plots are hardly original but their execution is superb and the characters live on long after completion. In turn it is sad, funny, suspenseful, insightful, and thoroughly enjoyable. Despite its demands on the reader the novel is a delight and should be on everyone’s bookshelf. I first read Cloud Atlas on an e-reader and then went out immediately and bought the paper book so that I could delve amongst the pages more readily. I have returned to it on several occasions and will do so again and again. If you have not yet read this novel I urge you to do so. A treat awaits you.

If you’re interested in Cloud Atlas, you’ll probably want to take a look at our review of the recent film adaptation.

Have you read Cloud Atlas or any works by David Mitchell? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of Cloud Atlas.

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About the Reviewer:  Bruce Taylor lives in Southend-on-Sea, Essex, England and is married with two grown up daughters. He left school at seventeen, became a computer programmer in 1969 and worked in or around IT until he retired in 2011. He’s an avid reader mostly of Science Fiction.

You can connect with Bruce on Twitter.

Review of Spinward Fringe Broadcast 6: Fragments by Randolph Lalonde

Average Fan Rating:
* * * * ½ 6 votes

Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★½ 


In Spinward Fringe Broadcast 6: Fragments, the Order of Eden has completely taken over Pandem. Tens of thousands of followers have populated its decimated earth with millions more on their way believing in the canton that they are the saved. Eve is their savior and the keeper of Paradise but few have seen her as Lister the Child Prophet speaks in her name making many promises but delivering few. Eve is waiting on the arrival of what she considers her children, the Eden Fleet, but worries that her humanity might make them see her as the enemy.


Meanwhile the Triton has been devastated by its battle with the Caran battle cruisers at Ossimi Ring Station. Some of the crew are revolting and demanding to be paid what they consider they are owed. With the Captain not on board, everyone is unsettled as they hide in a nebula from three battle cruisers, their only option to escape is to use a defense that has little chance of success.

This was a glorious book with battles warred on all fronts. It was wonderful to finally get into Eve’s mind and what was happening with the Order of Eden. I loved how Lalonde jumped among the characters in this book giving different viewpoints. My favourite part of the book is when the crew who are left on the Triton run the Ghost Ship scenario. This book was truly epic and left me breathless for more.

The prequel to this amazing series, Spinward Fringe Broadcast 0: Origins, is available for free download on Amazon. Click here to claim your copy.

Have you read Fragments or any works by Randolph Lalonde? Please share your comments below, and don’t forget to click on the yellow stars at the top of this post to share your rating (1-5 stars) of Spinward Fringe: 6 Fracture.

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About the Reviewer: Yvonne lives on the NSW/Victorian border in Australia so it is always boiling hot or freezing cold, in other words great reading weather. She reads across all genres with the exception of Westerns. During the day Yvonne works at a library and loves her job and can’t imagine doing anything else.

You can connect with Yvonne on Twitter or Goodreads.

Review of Ringworld by Larry Niven

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Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★☆ 


- “This is the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard of. You expect Louis and me to go charging out beyond known space with a kzin and a puppeteer for company, and all we know about where we are going is a length of blue ribbon and a light- spot! That’s-ridiculous!” – Teela Brown

I suppose the first question to ask regarding Larry Niven’s Science Fiction classic, Ringworld, is “Is it still relevant?” After all, it was first published over 40 years ago in 1970.

I wanted to read this book on my Kindle, but as far as I can tell, it doesn’t even exist as an ebook. I was fortunate enough to locate a gorgeous leather-bound version at my local library (see below), and yes, it is still a relevant, thought-provoking novel that should essentially be considered required reading for any serious fan of Science Fiction.

leather-bound cover for Ringworld by Larry Niven

Inside artwork for Ringworld by Larry Niven

I found Ringworld stimulating, but it is not a high-action, shoot-em-up type of book. If you’re looking for that sort of thing, you probably want to give Ringworld a pass.

In fact, Ringworld takes on so many big topics that I had a difficult time determining just how to dive into a proper book review. To orient future readers, I’ll begin with a very basic intro of the book’s main characters. The four main characters, two Earthlings and two travelers from other races, are aboard “The Long Shot,” a second quantum hyper drive spaceship bound for Ringworld.

Ringworld’s Main Characters:
Nessus, the puppeteer (race): He is the organizer of the expedition. His race is supposed to be very timid, but they have technology for a very fast spaceship, that he will share with the others as a reward for a successful mission. Niven describes Nesus as follows: “With his twin mouths, rich in nerves and muscles appropriate to mouths which were also hands, the puppeteer was a walking orchestra.”

Speaker-To-Animals, kzin (race) from violent race.

Louis Wu: 200 year-old Earthling. The story is told from his perspective.

Teela Brown: 20-year-old female Earthling whose family tree has had very good luck.

Cultural Diversity: If it’s not already apparent after examining the main characters in the story, one of the central themes that I noticed was overcoming the challenges of culturally diverse groups working together. This issue is addressed on 2 levels: 1) different cultures on Earth 2) cultures from different worlds.

As each main character is introduced, Niven shares background information about the characteristics of their respective races. While Speaker-To-Animals, a Kzin, is supposed to be from an extremely violent and unpredictable race, there are several examples of Speaker-To-Animals showing restraint and composure in circumstances that would stereotypically lead to violence. In fact, in the scene where Speaker-To-Animals, is introduced, he is insulted and all present are immediately impressed by his uncharacteristic composure.

Nessus, is from the race of puppeteers, known for their cowardice, and yet he assumes the role of protector of the group in several scenes. In fact, Louis Wu points out how Nessus is actually naturally brave, not cowardly when he explains, “But you didn’t stop to think about it,” said Louis. “It was instinctive. You automatically turn your back on an enemy. Turn, and kick. A sane puppeteer turns to fight, not to run. You’re not crazy.”

What Louis is saying is that just as a horse will turn around to kick its enemy, the Puppeteer race does the same. An interesting lesson in perspectives and prejudices, the Puppeteer’s perceived cowardice is simply misunderstood by other races.

Loss of Culture: Niven also attempts to understand the consequences of a more international Earth when Louis complains, “But the blending of cities was real. Louis had watched it happen. All the irrationalities of place and time and custom, blending into one big rationality of City, worldwide, like a dull grey paste.” This is true with the internationalization of the economy. Pieces of our cultural history slowly get lost and vanish one by one. Simple examples like the Pound transitioning to the Euro, and the loss of languages from generation to generation as people relocate and interact with other cultures. International cities really are growing more alike than more unique so I see this as quite perceptive of Niven.

Gender Issues: Really the major complaint with Ringworld is Niven’s weak depiction of women. The book is written in a way that not only draws the ire of self-described feminists, but also seems to lack any real concept of gender equality. Essentially, you don’t have to be a feminist to be offended by Niven’s portrayal of women.

One can make the claim that Ringworld was published in a time when women’s rights in the workplace were just starting to take hold, but it seems to be a very weak argument to suggest that the only reason Niven’s female characters were written as they were was because the book was published in 1970.

Bearing in mind that Ringworld is a work of fiction, it’s difficult not to read between the lines with quotes like “Teela stood behind him, safe for the moment in the ring of fighting, looking worried, like a good heroine.” This is but one example of the many instances of subservient characterization of women throughout the book.

The Art of War: One of the most fascinating themes in Ringworld was Niven’s presentation of conflict and war. Although there is no reference made to Sun Tzu’s The Art of War, his concept of war is based almost exclusively on this book. The following quotes from ‘The Art of War’ really summarize Niven’s approach: “The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting.” and “All warfare is based on deception.”

The stereotypical Science Fiction book shows humanity engaged in fierce battles with foes from other planets. Niven’s approach is to show that if there is another species with superior intellect and means, they will be able to influence us without us even knowing.

For example, the Puppeteer race has influenced both the human race and the Kzinti race to weaken themselves and not attack the Puppeteers. In the case of the Kzinti, Nessus says, “We took steps to evolve you (the Kzinti race) to the point where you could deal peaceably with races alien to you. Our methods were indirect, and very safe.” Then Nessus goes on to say that regarding the human race, the Puppeteers made them “lucky” by modifying the human evolutionary process and gene pool. Both are fascinating examples of winning a battle without ever going to war.

At the end of Ringworld, Louis postulates “I just wondered if the puppeteers didn’t get their name by playing god with the species around them. They’ve treated human and kzinti like puppets; there’s no denying that.”

Pleasure as a Weapon: Another related form of manipulation is Nessus’s use extreme pleasure instead of extreme pain to achieve a desired outcome. In Ringworld, Nessus’s weapon “the tasp” is similar to a taser, but the victim who is shot experiences extreme pleasure to the point where he or she can no longer function properly and then they beg for more.

Niven’s perspectives here are truly fascinating to consider. Perhaps we’re being influenced by an alien enemy right now?

Hard Science: I also appreciated Niven’s concept for the construction of a man-made, self-sustaining environment for humankind which is in fact the “Ringworld” that gives the novel its title. When published, this book was considered a “hard science” gem, although scientific holes were poked in Niven’s design after the book was released. Niven was so sensitive to this feedback, that he later published ‘The Ringworld Engineers,’ to address some of these hard science issues.

I’m not someone who reads Science Fiction to analyze the science in a work of fiction. Personally, I found the physical structure of Ringworld fascinating and very cleverly done. For me, I very much appreciated the inclusion of subtle details like “The orbiting rectangles around ring world were used to create a day/night daily cycle. Otherwise it would be sunny & noon all the time.”

Environmental Issues: When Niven wrote Ringworld, the concept of global warming was still relatively young, but throughout the book he cites examples of temperature changes on Earth pushing humanity to pursue off-world solutions. “Do you understand, then, that the heat of our civilization was making our world uninhabitable?” said Louis Wu. Then later in the book, Louis Wu references environmental degradation of Earth caused by a yeast that could eat through everything even plastic bags.

Population control is a recurring theme in the book. On Earth a “lottery” system is used to manage population, and regarding the Kzin Speaker-To-Animals says “We fight each other. The more crowded we grow, the more opportunity exists for one kzin to take offence at another. Our population problem adjusts itself.”

Future Technology : Continuing to investigate the use of science and technology in Ringworld, Niven does quite a good job of predicting some future advances in technology and medicine. Early in the book, he introduces “booster spice” which is essentially a combination of Viagra and the fountain of youth.

Teela Brown also mentions a “finder circuit” on her belt which sounds like a precursor to GPS. The travelers slave their flying cycles so they can all travel together without getting separated. Niven also has the crew travel in stasis to prevent injury and aging while they are in transit. There are many technological nuances like this which resonate quite well with me when viewed through the lens of time.

Humor: Niven also injects a little humor when appropriate. Apparently in Niven’s future “tanj” is the generic swear-word. I found myself wanting to laugh whenever one of the characters would utter “Tanj it!” or “What the tanj did you expect me to do!”

He also has a little fun with being an author when Louis We says “I did some writing once, but it turned out to be hard work, which was the last thing I expected.” For a hard science-based non action-oriented story, I find Ringworld quite easy to read. It does not read like a textbook which is a testament to Niven’s craft to take something very scientific and somewhat philosophical and make it interesting to read.


How do you rate a work of Classic Science Fiction like this on a numerical scale? It’s not an easy task. As mentioned early, I would consider it required reading for those passionate about Science Fiction. Niven’s work holds up remarkably well considering the length of time since Ringworld was published. The book skillfully covers some major topics like diversity, cultural biases, war and the environment. Not only are these important topics now, but they will continue to be important topics as human civilization moves forward.

Really, it’s Niven’s skewed view of gender equality that prevents me from rating Ringworld five stars. I’m sure there are strong opinions in both directions. Some suggesting that I’ve completely misunderstood Niven’s perspectives on gender and others who feel this book should not appear on any respectable reading lists because of its treatment of gender. Personally, I’d love to get your thoughts on this aspect of Ringworld or any of the other areas that I’ve covered in this brief review.

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Review of ARIA: Left Luggage by Geoff Nelder

Average Fan Rating:
* * * * * 1 vote

Rating from TwistedSciFi ★★★★☆ 


-What would you do if you couldn’t remember how to do your job? Where you lived? Even who your family are?

A mysterious metal suitcase is discovered lodged into the ISS. The crew are ordered to send it down to Earth unopened for investigation under strict quarantine. Procedures go wrong and the case, on opening, releases a highly contagious virus – ARIA (Alien Retrograde Infectious Amnesia). The virus causes everyone it infects to rapidly lose large amounts of their memories with catastrophic effects.


Watching all this drama unfold from his London apartment via internet uplink is Ryder Nape, science journalist. He tries to convince his boss and those close to him to escape to a remote research facility in Wales but how long could they possibly keep the virus at bay?

This is a thoroughly enjoyable and thought provoking sci-fi thriller by winner of best SF 2012, Geoff Nelder, and if ARIA is anything to go by, the award is well deserved. An excellent Science Fiction idea well delivered. It is amazing how much devastation could be initiated by just one little virus and Geoff brings all these little, and not so little details to life. What would you do if you couldn’t remember how to do your job? Where you lived? Even who your family are?

I’m so glad I came across this absorbing tale and I rate it four stars as I wanted a little bit more from the ending and it felt slightly unfinished. I expect I’ll just have to buy the sequel to find out what happens next.

Definitely well worth the money for a perfect slice of sci-fi escapism….go buy it.

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About the Author
J.M.Tweedie writes Science Fiction and is currently three quarters of the way through her first novel (as yet untitled). When she’s not writing, she can usually be found working hard at her full time day job with the NHS UK, looking after her family or with her head in a good book.
You can find out more about her and sample some of her writing at her website or alternatively follow on Twitter.